Submit Your Abstracts for ASDWA’s Annual Conference!

Please submit your abstract for ASDWA’s 2018 Annual Conference.  This year’s conference will be held October 22-25, 2018 at the Embassy Suites Des Moines in Des Moines, Iowa.  Approximately 250 participants from state and territorial drinking water programs, EPA and other Federal agencies, drinking water associations, consulting firms, and industry groups are expected to attend.  Presentation themes may include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Source water protection and sustainability
  • Clean Water Act/SDWA connections, nutrient pollution, and Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs)
  • Emerging contaminants – PFAS & 1,4-dioxane
  • Drinking water emergency preparedness, resiliency, and cybersecurity strategies and tools
  • SDWA implementation approaches and strategies including collaborations and partnerships
  • DW SRF tools and techniques
  • Small systems: TMF, sustainability strategies, technologies, and compliance
  • Workforce, operator certification, and/or technical assistance initiatives
  • Data management, electronic reporting, and SDWIS Prime
  • Lead service line replacement; lead testing in schools
  • Distribution system water quality
  • Emerging drinking water treatment technologies and optimization
  • Drinking water research
  • Risk assessment, risk communication, and consumer outreach

When reviewing proposals, ASDWA will give priority to those received from state drinking water program administrators and their staff.

Instructions for Submissions

You may submit an abstract online using ASDWA’s Call for Papers Submission Form.

Alternatively, you may submit a one-page abstract with the proposed presentation title, and the name, title, affiliation, and contact information for the speaker to Deirdre Mason of ASDWA at dmason@asdwa.org.

The deadline for submissions is June 8, 2018.

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Next Week! – ASDWA Webinar on USGS Drinking Water-Related Research, Data, and Tools

usgsASDWA will host a free webinar on Tuesday, April 24th from 1:00 to 2:30 pm (eastern) entitled, “USGS Drinking Water-Related Research, Data, and Tools.” This is the first in a series of ASDWA webinars where USGS scientists will share data and information relevant to state drinking water programs and stakeholders. This first webinar will provide a broad overview of high-visibility efforts related to monitoring, data, modeling, tools, and products from the USGS National Water Quality Program and the Toxic Substances Hydrology and Contaminant Biology Programs. Subsequent webinars will dig deeper into specific drinking water-related topics. State drinking water program personnel are encouraged to attend, along with anyone else who is interested and would like to participate. For more information and to register, GO HERE.

ACWA Releases First State Nutrient Reduction Progress Tracker Report

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The Association of State Clean Water Administrators (ACWA) has released its Nutrient Reduction Progress Tracker 1.0. The report summarizes the survey data received from state clean water programs in the fall of 2017 on state progress to reduce nutrient loads beyond the adoption of numeric nutrient criteria for lakes, estuaries, and flowing waters. This is the first in what will be a series of Nutrient Reduction Progress Tracker reports and includes responses from 31 states on state strategies, monitoring, assessment, non-point sources, point sources, and drinking water.

The ACWA Nutrients Working Group (NWG) that developed the Tracker is a partnership between ACWA, EPA, and ASDWA and currently includes two drinking water questions about the number of public water systems (PWSs) in violation of the Nitrate MCL and the estimated number and percent of PWSs operating to meet the Nitrate MCL. ASDWA is providing input on additional drinking water questions for next year’s Tracker survey that would help further explain the impacts of nutrient pollution on PWSs, both in terms of cost avoidance and additional costs for treatment, beyond conventional treatment. To view the report and to learn more about this effort, go here.

ASDWA Session Held this Week at the AWWA Sustainable Water Management Conference

The AWWA Sustainable Water Management (SWM) Conference was held this week in Seattle where ASDWA co-sponsored a technical session entitled “Harness the Power of the Clean Water Act to Protect Sources of Drinking Water.” Approximately 400 people attended the meeting from across the US including representatives from water utilities, associations, federal agencies, consulting firms, and four state drinking water programs. Other sessions at the conference focused on the sustainability of water supplies, water utility climate change adaptation, source water protection, pay for performance best practices for forest preservation and wildfire prevention, land use and water integrated planning, and more.

The ASDWA session speakers included:  Michelle Tucker from EPA Region 10 who provided an overview of how the Clean Water Act (CWA) can protect sources of drinking water; Sheree Stewart from the Oregon Source Water Protection (SWP) Program who spoke about how the state is using GIS to address point and nonpoint sources of pollution and emerging contaminants at the source; Corina Hayes from the Washington SWP Program who shared information about state efforts to use Drinking Water SRF funds to help communities develop SWP plans; David Dunn from the Washington Department of Ecology who spoke about how to leverage different CWA funding mechanisms (including the CWSRF) for SWP in Washington State; Bill Trueman from the Skagit Public Utility District (PUD) who shared how they used CWSRF funding to purchase land to protect their drinking water source; Deirdre Mason from ASDWA who spoke about ASDWA, state, and EPA CWA and Safe Drinking Water Act (CWA-SDWA) coordination efforts to address regulated and emerging ; and Bo Williams from EPA Headquarters who spoke about the National Source Water Collaborative’s CWA-SDWA infographic for water utilities and local stakeholders to provide input into state CWA provisions and permitting efforts. To learn more about these efforts, check out:

For more information about the AWWA SWM conference, visit the AWWA website.

Two USDA NRCS Funding Opportunities Available for Easement Restoration and State Conservation Innovation Grants

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Easement Restoration Funding:  NRCS is requesting proposals from qualified individuals and organizations to complete restoration work on eligible degraded wetland, floodplain and forestland properties. Up to $250 million is available for these restoration projects in all 50 states and territories. Restoration activities may include: designing restoration plans, installing conservation practices including structural and vegetative, construction management and inspection. Agreements will be three years in length. Potential applicants should review the funding opportunity, USDA-NRCS-US-WRP-ACEP- EWPP-HFRP-18-01, at https://www.grants.gov/, which includes application materials and submission procedures. Applications are due by May 18, 2018. For more information on wetland, floodplain and forestland easements, visit the NRCS easements page. See the full announcement here USDA-NRCS-US-WRP-ACEP-EWPP-HFRP-18-01.

State Conservation Innovation Grants (CIG):  The NRCS CIG offers both national and state grant competitions. The national competition closed in late February but in 2018, twenty states are offering CIG funding opportunities and many state competitions are still open. These state CIG competitions target small projects (maximum award size is $75,000) that address natural resource concerns (including drinking water quality) at a local or state level. The following states and territories currently have opportunities posted on Grants.gov LAORMDMIMOVAAZMECAIDKSSDPAGANMRINYIAOK, the Pacific Island Area and the Caribbean Area. For more information on any of these competitions, please contact the relevant NRCS state office.

 

It’s Not Too Late to Register for Today’s Webinar on Road Salt!

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Date:  Thursday, March 8, 2018

Time:  2:00 to 3:30 pm (eastern)

REGISTER HERE

The American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) Center for Environmental Excellence (CEE) and the Association of State Drinking Water Administrators (ASDWA) are pleased to announce a free webinar entitled, “How State Highway and Drinking Water Programs Can Work Together for Mutual Benefits and Reduce Impacts from Road Salt.” The webinar will include an introduction from AASHTO, a brief presentation about ASDWA’s new handout and web page on the “Intersection of Roads and Drinking Water,” and feature presentations from representatives for each of the state programs in New Hampshire and Maryland, who will share how they work together, along with a few examples and some more specific information on best practices for road salt applications and impacts to drinking water. State drinking water program and state highway program personnel are encouraged to attend, along with anyone else who is interested and would like to participate.

AASHTO-ASDWA Webinar:  How State Highway and Drinking Water Programs Can Work Together for Mutual Benefits and Reduce Impacts from Road Salt

road salt truck
Date:  Thursday, March 8, 2018

Time:  2:00 to 3:30 pm (eastern)

REGISTER HERE

The American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) Center for Environmental Excellence (CEE) and the Association of State Drinking Water Administrators (ASDWA) are pleased to announce a free webinar entitled, “How State Highway and Drinking Water Programs Can Work Together for Mutual Benefits and Reduce Impacts from Road Salt.” The webinar will include an introduction from AASHTO, a brief presentation about ASDWA’s new handout and web page on the “Intersection of Roads and Drinking Water,” and feature presentations from representatives for each of the state programs in New Hampshire and Maryland, who will share how they work together, along with a few examples and some more specific information on best practices for road salt applications and impacts to drinking water. State drinking water program and state highway program personnel are encouraged to attend, along with anyone else who is interested and would like to participate.

EPA Seeks Comments on Clean Water Act Coverage of Groundwater Discharge Connections to Surface Water

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On February 20th, EPA published a Federal Register Notice asking for comments on whether point source discharges, that have a direct hydrologic connection to jurisdictional surface waters via groundwater or other subsurface flow, should be subject to Clean Water Act regulation. EPA is requesting comment on whether the Agency should consider clarification or revision of those statements and if so, comment on how clarification or revision should be provided. Comments are due on or before May 21, 2018. Comments must be submitted at http://www.regulations.gov using Docket ID No. EPA-HQ-OW-2018-0063. For more information, view the Federal Register Notice. For questions, contact Scott Wilson of EPA at (202) 564-6087 or wilson.js@epa.gov. For some more perspective, read this Earth & Water Law Group Article.

CDC’s Safe Well Water e-Learning Series for Public Health Programs

 

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CDC’s Safe Water Program Improvement e-Learning Series (SWPI) helps health department programs strengthen services to people that use wells, cisterns, springs, and other private drinking water systems not covered by the Safe Drinking Water Act. Oversight for these systems vary, but core elements of successful, sustainable programs are similar. SWPI walks through the 10 Essential Environmental Public Health Services and the Environmental Public Health Performance Standards and provides examples of using them to identify and fill program gaps in these types of drinking water programs. This is a free program that requires you to set up an account and includes nine different courses that take approximately one to two hours to complete. For more information, visit CDC’s website.

EPA Fact Sheet on Funding Agricultural BMPs with CWSRF

EPA CWSRF Fact Sheet

EPA has published a fact sheet on how the Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) can be used for agricultural best management practices (BMPs) to protect water quality, including drinking water sources. The fact sheet shares information about the types of projects that can be funded, along with state examples highlighting the Maryland and Virginia Farm Credit Banks that can provide financing to farmers for the entire cost of a project and can be partially repaid by a USDA grant; and the Minnesota Ag BMP Loan Program that has used CWSRF funds for over 13,000 projects by leveraging funding from the state and other sources. State drinking water programs are encouraged to reach out to their Clean Water Act program partners to discuss CWSRF funding options like this (if you haven’t already) that may be used to implement BMPs in sensitive source water protection areas. View the fact sheet here.  For more information about other uses of the CWSRF, you may also want to read through EPA’s document entitled “Financing Options for Nontraditional Eligibilities in the CWSRF Programs“.