AWWA is Accepting Abstracts for 2018 Sustainable Water Management Conference

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AWWA wishes to invite authors and experts in the field to submit abstracts on a variety of sustainability topics for its Sustainable Water Management Conference being held March 25-28, 2018 in Seattle, Washington.  Abstract topics may include:

  • Water Resources Planning & Management
  • Water & Energy Efficiency
  • Sustainable Utilities & Infrastructure Resiliency
  • Water Conservation Programs
  • Climate Change Mitigation & Adaption

The abstract submission deadline is Friday, July 14, 2017.  For a detailed list of abstract topics and more information, visit the website HERE.

 

EPA Webinar on Free Emergency Preparedness Resources for Water Utilities

 

EPA RtoR

On May 3, 2017 from 1:00pm – 2:00pm (eastern), EPA’s Water Security Division will host a webinar on free preparedness tools and resources for drinking water and wastewater utilities, including the new Route to Resilience (RtoR) Tool.  The webinar will benefit water utility operators and managers, state and tribal primacy agencies, drinking water and wastewater utility stakeholders, and water utility partners and associations.  REGISTER HERE.  Links and instructions will be sent to participants via email prior to the event. If you have additional questions, please contact WSD-Outreach@epa.gov.

Webinar on Innovative State Water Agency Practices: Working Toward Resilience

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EPA’s Office of Water is hosting a webinar to showcase state innovative practices that build resilience into their water resource programs, as part of a collaboration with ASDWA, the Association of Clean Water Administrators, and the Association of State Wetland Managers.

DATE:              April 27, 2017

TIME:               1:00 – 3:00pm (eastern)

REGISTER HERE

This webinar will highlight three innovative state initiatives that address novel stressors and improve the resilience of program operations. These examples are drawn from the Innovative State Water Agency Practices database, which includes additional practices on EPA’s website.

New USGS Interactive Map Looks at Long-term Water Quality Changes

USGS Mapper

USGS has launched a new interactive map that provides a comprehensive, long-term look at changes in the quality of our Nation’s rivers and streams over the last four decades. For the first time, monitoring data collected by 74 organizations at almost 1,400 sites have been combined to provide a nationwide look at changes in the quality of our rivers and streams in the 40 years since passage of the Clean Water Act.  The interactive map can be used to track trends of 51 water-quality constituents and 38 aquatic-life metrics at nearly 1,400 sites during four time periods between 1972 and 2012.  For more information about this and other maps, visit the USGS website.

EPA and Forest Service Webinar on CWSRF Funding for Land Conservation Projects

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On Thursday, April 13 from 1:30 to 3:00pm (eastern), EPA and the U.S. Forest Service will host a webinar entitled, “Sponsorship:  A Unique Tool for Funding Land Conservation Projects with the Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF),” as part of the CWSRF webinar series.  During the webinar, Mike Curley, the author of Fundamentals of Water Finance, will discuss the use of sponsorship programs for funding land conservation projects with the CWSRF.  In addition, Patti Cale-Finnegan from the Iowa CWSRF program and Jerry Rouch from the Ohio CWSRF program will provide specific examples from their states and explain the role of sponsorship and partnerships with land trust organizations.  At the time of the webinar, please log on directly at:  https://usfs.adobeconnect.com/spf-ucf/.  To view the announcement, go HERE.

 

EPA Releases New Updated Version of DWMAPS

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EPA has released a new 2.0 Version of its Drinking Water Mapping Application to Protect Source Waters (DWMAPS) tool.  DWMAPS 2.0 now provides real-time updates from data sources and improves interactivity within EPA’s GeoPlatform and with users’ own data. DWMAPS is an online mapping tool that helps state and utility drinking water professionals in concert with other state and local mapping tools to update their source water assessments and protection plans. Watershed protection groups and source water collaboratives can also use DWMAPS to locate drinking water providers, potential sources of contamination, polluted waterways as well as information on protection projects and Source Water Collaboratives in their area.

Certain features have been modified from the original version. For example, in DWMAPS 2.0 the “Potential Sources of Contamination” tool currently searches only for dischargers permitted through the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program. Users may explore additional point sources regulated by other programs in the DWMAPS 2.0 layer list.   DWMAPS can be accessed directly at: https://www.epa.gov//dwmaps.  For more information or questions, please contact Sherri Comeford of EPA at Comerford.Sherri@epa.gov or (202) 564-4639.

April 20th EPA Water Quality Modeling Webinar

 

EPA’s Water Quality Modeling Workgroup will host a webinar, entitled “Introduction to SWAT” on Thursday, April 20th at 1:00pm to 3:00pm (eastern) as part of its webinar series. This webinar will introduce the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) water quality model developed by USDA Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) and Texas A&M AgriLife Research. SWAT is a small watershed to river basin-scale model to simulate the quality and quantity of surface and ground water and predict the environmental impact of land use, land management practices, and climate change. SWAT is widely used in assessing soil erosion prevention and control, non-point source pollution control and regional management in watersheds. The webinar will also present several examples where SWAT has been applied in real world settings.  Register HERE.  Previous webinars are also available at: http://www.epa.gov/tmdl/tmdl-modeling.

EPA Publishes New Route to Resilience Tool

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EPA has published its new Route to Resilience (RtoR) tool that will help small and medium sized drinking water and wastewater utilities learn more about becoming resilient to all-hazards such as floods, tornadoes, hurricanes and contamination incidents.  The interactive desktop application guides utilities through 5 stops along the Route to Resilience — Assess, Plan, Train, Respond, and Recover. RtoR also provides utilities with a custom report that highlights products and tools that will help utilities on their path to resilience.  To share with your utilities and download the tool, visit EPA’s website.

Submit Your Abstracts Now for ASDWA’s 2017 Annual Conference

 

Please submit your abstract for ASDWA’s 2017 Annual Conference.  This year’s conference will be held October 17-20, 2017 at the Sheraton Norfolk Waterside Hotel in Norfolk, VA. Approximately 250 participants from state and territorial drinking water programs, EPA and other Federal agencies, drinking water associations, consulting firms, and industry groups are expected to attend.  Presentation themes may include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Source water protection and sustainability of water supplies
  • Clean Water Act/SDWA connections, nutrient pollution, and Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs)
  • Extreme weather, water and energy efficiency, and conservation
  • Drinking water emergency preparedness and resiliency strategies and tools
  • Small systems: TMF, sustainability strategies, technologies, and compliance
  • Emerging drinking water treatment technologies and optimization of current technology
  • Workforce, operator certification, and/or technical assistance initiatives
  • SDWA implementation approaches and strategies including collaborations and partnerships
  • State revolving loan fund tools and techniques/green infrastructure strategies
  • Data management and electronic reporting
  • Distribution system issues
  • Emerging contaminants in drinking water
  • Drinking water research
  • Risk assessment, risk communication and consumer outreach

When reviewing proposals, ASDWA will give priority to those received from state drinking water program administrators and their staff.  If you would like to make a presentation, please submit a one-page abstract with the proposed presentation title, and the name, title, affiliation, and contact information for the speaker to Deirdre Mason of ASDWA at dmason@asdwa.org by June 1, 2017.

For More Information, please view the ASDWA 2017 Annual Conference Call for Papers on the ASDWA website.

State CWA-SDWA Workshop Held this Week Identifies Next Steps for Continued Coordination

CWA-SDWA Workshop Photo

On March 21, ASDWA, the Association of Clean Water Administrators (ACWA), and the Ground Water Protection Council (GWPC) held a half-day Clean Water Act – Safe Drinking Water Act (CWA-SDWA) Workshop in Washington, DC.  Approximately 50 participants attended from state clean water, drinking water, and ground water programs from across the country, as well as all the EPA Water Offices, two EPA Regions, and USGS.  Thanks especially to the New Hampshire, Utah, New York, Minnesota, Maryland, Virginia, and Pennsylvania Drinking Water Programs for participating on behalf of ASDWA.

The purpose of the workshop was to discuss CWA-SDWA coordination opportunities and challenges and identify next steps to better protect sources of drinking water (both groundwater and surface water) and improve water quality.  The first part of the workshop included:

  • Welcoming remarks from Jennifer McLain of EPA’s Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water and Sheila Frace of EPA’s Office of Wastewater Management;
  • A presentation from Wendy Drake and Amie Howell of EPA Regions 5 and Region 3 who shared information about their CWA-SDWA Integration Checklist for working within their offices and with their states;
  • A presentation from Deirdre Mason of ASDWA who provided information about the National Source Water Collaboratives tools and resources that can be used to help support CWA-SDWA efforts and local level stakeholder engagement; and
  • Presentations from Ryan Chapman of Nebraska, Jennifer Wigal of Oregon, John Barndt of Delaware, and Peter Goodmann of Kentucky about their efforts to coordinate across clean water, drinking water, and ground water programs to protect drinking water sources.

The rest and majority of the workshop was spent in breakout groups discussing where states are making progress at CWA-SDWA and related program coordination and collaboration, identifying challenges and barriers that impede progress on these activities, and brainstorming on next steps and action items to continue to work on these types of efforts after the meeting.  Some key discussion points and needs identified during the breakouts included:

  • Using an integrated water resources management approach to protect source water quantity and quality, address infrastructure needs, and identify opportunities for water reuse;
  • Getting buy-in from senior management to work across programs;
  • Working with other programs and partners to address and communicate risk on emerging contaminants;
  • Making it easier to share data and conduct real time water monitoring for both surface and ground waters;
  • Working with agricultural programs and developing numeric nutrient criteria to address nonpoint source pollution; and
  • Using the Source Water Collaborative Learning Exchange as a platform to share information.

At the end of the workshop, participants identified a number of next steps and action items including:

  • Conducting more workshops like this at both the national and regional levels on specific CWA program areas;
  • Hosting discussions on a true definition of safe drinking water and developing talking points on the cost vs. risk of addressing drinking water contaminants;
  • Continuing to share state program coordination examples and encouraging state to state peer mentoring;
  • Expanding the use of the Region 5/3 integration checklist in other regions and states;
  • Developing a one-stop shop clearinghouse for source water protection funding sources; and
  • Using EPA’s Recovery Potential Screening Tool and the soon to be released Healthy Watershed Assessment for furthering source water protection efforts.

ASDWA, ACWA , GWPC, and EPA plan to continue working together on these action items to help states and stakeholders move forward with their coordination efforts, so stay tuned for more information in the near future.  If you have any questions, please contact Deirdre Mason of ASDWA at dmason@asdwa.org or 703-812-4775.