Don’t Forget to Register for the ASDWA – USGS Webinar on Chemical and Microbial Contaminants in Drinking Water

usgsOn Wednesday, September 5, 2018, from 1:00 to 2:30 pm (eastern), ASDWA will host a webinar with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) entitled, “Understanding Chemical and Microbial Contaminants in Drinking Water:  Raw, Treated, and Tap Water.” The webinar will be presented in three segments to address key issues and questions of drinking water quality. The segments include:

  • The USGS groundwater quality assessments in 11 principal drinking water aquifers across the US.
  • The EPA and USGS collaborative effort to provide a more robust dataset on a wide range of chemical and microbial contaminants present in source and treated waters, along with a case example from a participating water utility in Massachusetts.
  • The USGS partnership effort to quantify tap water exposure pathways in public and private water supplies.

For more information and to register for the webinar, visit ASDWA’s website.

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September 2018 Events to Promote Groundwater Protection

Protect your GW DayProtect Your Groundwater Day is September 4. This day provides a great opportunity to promote public health and environmental protection by getting involved and celebrating. State drinking water programs should consider sharing information about “Protect Your Groundwater Day” with your water utilities and citizens to create greater awareness about protecting this valuable resource. The National Ground Water Association has put together some free marketing materials to help you promote the event including social media messaging and tips for #PYGWD, a press release template, and logos, posters and graphics at WellOwner.org.

septicsmart_week_2018_save_date_010318SepticSmart Week is September 17-21. Each year, SepticSmart Week is held with outreach activities to encourage homeowners and communities to care for and maintain their septic systems. This year, SepticSmart Week will be held from September 17-21. State drinking water programs and communities will want to use this opportunity to promote homeowner education and awareness and educate local decision makers about infrastructure options available to improve and sustain communities. Visit EPA’s website to download SepticSmart materials and a proclamation template, read about suggested events and activities, view highlights and case studies of community efforts across the nation, and join in the conversation on social media at #SepticSmartWeek.

 

 

ASDWA – USGS Webinar on Chemical and Microbial Contaminants in Drinking Water

On September 5, 2018, from 1:00 to 2:30 pm (eastern), ASDWA will host a webinar with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) entitled, “Understanding Chemical and Microbial Contaminants in Drinking Water:  Raw, Treated, and Tap Water.” The webinar will be presented in three segments to address key issues and questions of drinking water quality. The segments include:

  1. The USGS groundwater quality assessments in 11 principal drinking water aquifers across the US.
  2. The EPA and USGS collaborative effort to provide a more robust dataset on a wide range of chemical and microbial contaminants present in source and treated waters, along with a case example from a participating water utility in Massachusetts.
  3. The USGS partnership effort to quantify tap water exposure pathways in public and private water supplies.

For more information and to register for the webinar, visit ASDWA’s website.

Updated USGS Ground Water Quality Mapper

usgsThe U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water Quality Program has updated its interactive web tool that maps decadal changes in groundwater quality across the nation. The web tool, Decadal Change in Groundwater Quality, now includes more groundwater well networks and data analyzed over a longer time span. In the update, groundwater quality data were added for an additional 218 wells in 6 well networks, increasing the number of wells to 1,718 and the number of well networks to 73.  Additionally, data for 14 well networks resampled during 2012–14 were incorporated, allowing the user to visualize changes across three roughly decadal sampling events for those networks since the 1990s.

Users of the web tool can easily visualize changes in both inorganic and organic constituent concentrations in groundwater, including chloride, nitrate, several pesticides, and some drinking-water disinfection byproducts. The website also includes a description of the methods used to evaluate changes in groundwater quality and a link to the complete set of data. For additional information on the groundwater-quality web tool, or for data and methods used, contact Bruce Lindsey (blindsey@usgs.gov).

Stay Tuned for New USDA NWQI Drinking Water Protection Pilot Opportunity

nrcs_logo_largerASDWA has learned that the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) and EPA are making a change to the National Water Quality Initiative (NWQI) this year (for FY 2019) that includes a new pilot program specifically aimed at protecting drinking water supplies, including groundwater. The NWQI was launched in 2012 to reduce nonpoint sources of nutrients, sediment, and pathogens related to agriculture in small high-priority watersheds in each state. NWQI provides a way to accelerate voluntary, on-farm conservation investments and focused water quality monitoring and assessment resources where they can deliver the greatest benefits for clean water.  NRCS recently announced that it is updating and expanding NWQI for FY 2019 and has committed to funding the NWQI through 2023. While many of the fundamental components of the NWQI will remain in place for FY19, there are some notable changes in the FY19 NWQI bulletin and thinking ahead for NWQI in FY20.  In addition to continuing the current NWQI focus on addressing water bodies impaired under the Clean Water Act, NWQI will now include a component to protect surface and groundwater sources of drinking water.

This is a great new opportunity for state drinking water and source water protection programs that will be coordinated with NRCS State Conservationists to collaborate on proposing SWP areas and specific projects for the pilot. NRCS and EPA’s source water protection staff in cooperation with ACWA and ASDWA are working to develop guidance and resources for NRCS staff and state drinking water agencies to get the pilot underway.  An informational webinar is being planned and a date will be announced in the coming week.  Stay tuned for more information that will be coming soon!

Don’t Forget to Register for Next Week’s ASDWA Webinar on 1,4-Dioxane

1 4 diox chem structureASDWA is pleased to announce a free webinar on Tuesday, June 5th from 1:00 to 2:30 pm (eastern) entitled, “State Efforts to Assess and Address 1,4-Dioxane through Drinking Water, Ground Water, and Clean Water Programs.” The purpose of the webinar is to share information about state efforts to assess and address 1,4-dioxane, an unregulated contaminant that is causing states and water utilities to become increasingly concerned about potential health impacts from elevated levels of 1,4-dioxane in both groundwater and surface water drinking water sources. The webinar presenters are Brandon Kernen from the State of New Hampshire and Rebecca Sadosky from the State of North Carolina. This webinar also builds on the efforts of ASDWA, the Association of Clean Water Administrators (ACWA), the Ground Water Protection Council (GWPC), and EPA to share and promote Clean Water Act and Safe Drinking Water Act (CWA-SDWA) coordination activities across state and EPA water programs. State, interstate, tribal, and federal water programs, water utilities, and technical assistance providers are encouraged to attend, along with anyone else who would like to participate. REGISTER HERE.

ASDWA Webinar on 1,4-Dioxane for State Drinking Water, Ground Water, and Clean Water Programs

1 4 diox chem structureASDWA is pleased to announce a free webinar on Tuesday, June 5th from 1:00 to 2:30 pm (eastern) entitled, “State Efforts to Assess and Address 1,4-Dioxane through Drinking Water, Ground Water, and Clean Water Programs.” The purpose of the webinar is to share information about state efforts to assess and address 1,4-dioxane, an unregulated contaminant that is causing states and water utilities to become increasingly concerned about potential health impacts from elevated levels of 1,4-dioxane in both groundwater and surface water drinking water sources. The webinar presenters are Brandon Kernen from the State of New Hampshire and Rebecca Sadosky from the State of North Carolina. This webinar also builds on the efforts of ASDWA, the Association of Clean Water Administrators (ACWA), the Ground Water Protection Council (GWPC), and EPA to share and promote Clean Water Act and Safe Drinking Water Act (CWA-SDWA) coordination activities across state and EPA water programs. State, interstate, tribal, and federal water programs, water utilities, and technical assistance providers are encouraged to attend, along with anyone else who would like to participate. REGISTER HERE.

It’s Not Too Late to Register for Today’s Webinar on Road Salt!

road salt truck

Date:  Thursday, March 8, 2018

Time:  2:00 to 3:30 pm (eastern)

REGISTER HERE

The American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) Center for Environmental Excellence (CEE) and the Association of State Drinking Water Administrators (ASDWA) are pleased to announce a free webinar entitled, “How State Highway and Drinking Water Programs Can Work Together for Mutual Benefits and Reduce Impacts from Road Salt.” The webinar will include an introduction from AASHTO, a brief presentation about ASDWA’s new handout and web page on the “Intersection of Roads and Drinking Water,” and feature presentations from representatives for each of the state programs in New Hampshire and Maryland, who will share how they work together, along with a few examples and some more specific information on best practices for road salt applications and impacts to drinking water. State drinking water program and state highway program personnel are encouraged to attend, along with anyone else who is interested and would like to participate.

EPA Seeks Comments on Clean Water Act Coverage of Groundwater Discharge Connections to Surface Water

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On February 20th, EPA published a Federal Register Notice asking for comments on whether point source discharges, that have a direct hydrologic connection to jurisdictional surface waters via groundwater or other subsurface flow, should be subject to Clean Water Act regulation. EPA is requesting comment on whether the Agency should consider clarification or revision of those statements and if so, comment on how clarification or revision should be provided. Comments are due on or before May 21, 2018. Comments must be submitted at http://www.regulations.gov using Docket ID No. EPA-HQ-OW-2018-0063. For more information, view the Federal Register Notice. For questions, contact Scott Wilson of EPA at (202) 564-6087 or wilson.js@epa.gov. For some more perspective, read this Earth & Water Law Group Article.

CDC’s Safe Well Water e-Learning Series for Public Health Programs

 

cdc safe water graphic

CDC’s Safe Water Program Improvement e-Learning Series (SWPI) helps health department programs strengthen services to people that use wells, cisterns, springs, and other private drinking water systems not covered by the Safe Drinking Water Act. Oversight for these systems vary, but core elements of successful, sustainable programs are similar. SWPI walks through the 10 Essential Environmental Public Health Services and the Environmental Public Health Performance Standards and provides examples of using them to identify and fill program gaps in these types of drinking water programs. This is a free program that requires you to set up an account and includes nine different courses that take approximately one to two hours to complete. For more information, visit CDC’s website.