September 2018 Events to Promote Groundwater Protection

Protect your GW DayProtect Your Groundwater Day is September 4. This day provides a great opportunity to promote public health and environmental protection by getting involved and celebrating. State drinking water programs should consider sharing information about “Protect Your Groundwater Day” with your water utilities and citizens to create greater awareness about protecting this valuable resource. The National Ground Water Association has put together some free marketing materials to help you promote the event including social media messaging and tips for #PYGWD, a press release template, and logos, posters and graphics at WellOwner.org.

septicsmart_week_2018_save_date_010318SepticSmart Week is September 17-21. Each year, SepticSmart Week is held with outreach activities to encourage homeowners and communities to care for and maintain their septic systems. This year, SepticSmart Week will be held from September 17-21. State drinking water programs and communities will want to use this opportunity to promote homeowner education and awareness and educate local decision makers about infrastructure options available to improve and sustain communities. Visit EPA’s website to download SepticSmart materials and a proclamation template, read about suggested events and activities, view highlights and case studies of community efforts across the nation, and join in the conversation on social media at #SepticSmartWeek.

 

 

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ASDWA – USGS Webinar on Chemical and Microbial Contaminants in Drinking Water

On September 5, 2018, from 1:00 to 2:30 pm (eastern), ASDWA will host a webinar with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) entitled, “Understanding Chemical and Microbial Contaminants in Drinking Water:  Raw, Treated, and Tap Water.” The webinar will be presented in three segments to address key issues and questions of drinking water quality. The segments include:

  1. The USGS groundwater quality assessments in 11 principal drinking water aquifers across the US.
  2. The EPA and USGS collaborative effort to provide a more robust dataset on a wide range of chemical and microbial contaminants present in source and treated waters, along with a case example from a participating water utility in Massachusetts.
  3. The USGS partnership effort to quantify tap water exposure pathways in public and private water supplies.

For more information and to register for the webinar, visit ASDWA’s website.

CDC’s Safe Well Water e-Learning Series for Public Health Programs

 

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CDC’s Safe Water Program Improvement e-Learning Series (SWPI) helps health department programs strengthen services to people that use wells, cisterns, springs, and other private drinking water systems not covered by the Safe Drinking Water Act. Oversight for these systems vary, but core elements of successful, sustainable programs are similar. SWPI walks through the 10 Essential Environmental Public Health Services and the Environmental Public Health Performance Standards and provides examples of using them to identify and fill program gaps in these types of drinking water programs. This is a free program that requires you to set up an account and includes nine different courses that take approximately one to two hours to complete. For more information, visit CDC’s website.

Plan Now for National Groundwater Awareness and Fix-a-Leak Weeks in March

National Groundwater Awareness Week is taking place on March 11-17, and EPA’s WaterSense Fix-a-Leak is taking place the following week on March 19-25, 2018.

National Groundwater Awareness Week is March 11-17

ngwa awareness weekPlan now to promote public awareness about groundwater during this year’s National Groundwater Awareness Week. The National Ground Water Association (NGWA) invites you to join them in this effort by spreading the word through your website, timely newsletter publications, social media, or other education and outreach activities. This year’s theme of “Tend, Test, Treat,” includes an associated video for private well owners, a press release template, and other useful information and materials. State drinking water programs and health departments can use these tools to reach private well owners and the general public, and also pass this information along to your water utilities to share with their customers. For more information, to download the materials, and to become a groundwater advocate, visit NGWA’s website at Ground Water Awareness Week and Wellowner.org.

Fix-a-Leak Week is March 19-25

fix a leak week

EPA’s WaterSense program and its partners (including ASDWA and many states) will raise awareness about the importance of eliminating household leaks during the 10th Annual Fix-a-Leak Week. ASDWA encourages states to promote this week with your water systems and communities by sharing information through newsletters and social media, and hosting community events that highlight the water-saving benefits of fixing household leaks. Help them get started to chase down leaks and reduce water waste with a few simple tips, along with educational resources and a video you can find on the WaterSense website.

September Promotional Events:  Protect Your Groundwater Day and SepticSmart Week

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Protect Your Groundwater Day is September 5th:  The National Ground Water Association (NGWA) is encouraging the protection of public health and the health of the environment by celebrating “Protect Your Groundwater Day.” This year’s celebration will take place on September 5th. State drinking water programs should consider sharing information about “Protect Your Groundwater Day” with their water utilities and residents, as a means to create greater awareness about protecting this valuable resource.  For more information, visit the NGWA website and WellOwner.orgwebsite. To ask questions, please contact Cliff Tryens of NGWA at ctreyens@ngwa.org.

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SepticSmart Week is September 18-22:  Each year, EPA holds SepticSmart Week with outreach activities to encourage homeowners and communities to care for and maintain their septic systems. This year, SepticSmart Week will be held from September 18-22. State drinking water programs and communities will want to use this opportunity to inform homeowners on proper septic system care and maintenance, promote homeowner education and awareness, and educate local decision makers about infrastructure options available to improve and sustain communities. Visit EPA’s website to download SepticSmart materials and a proclamation template, read about suggested events and activities, view highlights and case studies of community efforts across the nation, and participate in the conversation on social media #SepticSmartWeek.

EPA Webinar on How State and Local Governments Can Promote SepticSmart Week in September

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EPA’s Decentralized MOU Partnership is hosting a webinar on May 16th from 2:00pm to 3:30pm (eastern).  This webinar will share information from presenters in two states (Washington and Alaska) and one city (Ogden Dunes, Indiana) whose governors and mayors have made SepticSmart Week Proclamations.  Learn more about these proclamations and other activities by joining this webinar and hearing from individuals who led the efforts at the state, county, or local level.

SPACE IS LIMITED. RESERVE YOUR WEBINAR SEAT NOW AT: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6651424505486693378

For additional information on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Decentralized Wastewater MOU Partnership and past recorded webinars, please visit: https://www.epa.gov/septic

 

 

 

 

Next Week is National Groundwater Awareness Week

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National Groundwater Awareness Week is taking place next week, from March 5-11.  Please consider helping the National Ground Water Association (NGWA) promote this special week with your water utilities and the public by sharing some information and resources about the importance of ground water on your websites, and through social media and other communication channels.  Following are some resources that NGWA has created about groundwater and water well stewardship (including information for private well maintenance). Some can be used as is; others can be adapted, modified, or customized as necessary.

For more information and to become a “Groundwater Advocate,” please contact Cliff Treyens of NGWA at ctreyens@ngwa.org.

USGS Webinar on PFASs in New Hampshire’s Drinking Water

The USGS National Water Quality Monitoring Council will hold a webinar on Tuesday, March 28 from 1:00pm – 2:00pm (eastern).  During the webinar, Brandon Kernen from the New Hampshire Drinking Water Program will present “The Assessment and Regulation of PFASs in New Hampshire’s Drinking Water.”  He will discuss the detection of Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS) at multiple sites that have contaminated hundreds of private drinking water wells and several public water supply sources serving tens of thousands of people.  He will also share recommendations to address the associated regulatory, environmental, technical, and social challenges.  Click HERE for more information and to register.

Plan Now for Protect Your Groundwater Day and SepticSmart Week in September

pygwd16

Protect Your Groundwater Day:  The National Ground Water Association (NGWA) is encouraging the protection of public health and the health of the environment by celebrating “Protect Your Groundwater Day.” This year’s celebration will take place on September 6, where every citizen is encouraged to ACT: Acknowledge the causes of preventable groundwater contamination, Consider which apply to you, and then Take action by keeping groundwater safe from contamination, as well as using it wisely by not wasting it.  State drinking water programs should consider sharing information about “Protect Your Groundwater Day” with their water utilities and residents, as a means to create greater awareness about protecting this valuable resource.  For more information, visit the NGWA website and WellOwner.org website. To ask questions, please contact Cliff Tryens of NGWA at ctreyens@ngwa.org.

SepticSmart Week Seal 2016

SepticSmart Week:  Each year, EPA holds SepticSmart Week with outreach activities to encourage homeowners and communities to care for and maintain their septic systems. This year, SepticSmart Week will be held from September 19-23.  State drinking water programs and communities will want to use this opportunity to inform homeowners on proper septic system care, promote homeowner education and awareness, and educate local decision makers about infrastructure options available to improve and sustain communities. Visit EPA’s website to download SepticSmart materials and a proclamation template, read about suggested events and activities, and view highlights and case studies of community efforts across the nation.

USGS Publishes Groundwater Corrosivity Study

A recent U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) assessment of more than 20,000 wells nationwide indicates that groundwater found in 25 states in the northeast, southeast, and northwest, and the District of Columbia has a high potential for being naturally corrosive. The findings have the greatest implications for homeowners with private drinking water systems, though some of the data in the study are for samples collected from public supply wells. Naturally corrosive water is not dangerous to consume by itself. Nevertheless, it can cause health-related problems by reacting with pipes and plumbing fixtures in homes. If plumbing materials contain lead or copper, these metals may be leached into the water supply by corrosive water. Signs of corrosive water causing leaching of metals may include bluish-green stains in sinks, metallic taste to water, and small leaks in plumbing fixtures.

Two indicators were used to assess the potential corrosivity of groundwater. The first index is the Langelier Saturation Index, an indicator of whether mineral scale may form on the inside of pipes and prevent the release of lead to drinking water. The second indicator, the chloride-to-sulfate ratio, measures the potential of source water to promote the release of lead in pipes through galvanic corrosion. These two indicators were combined into one indicator to assess the prevalence of potentially corrosive groundwater nationwide.  View maps, download the data, and learn more about this national assessment of groundwater corrosivity online.  For more information, contact Ken Belitz of USGS at kbelitz@usgs.gov.

 

Corrosivity map