Register Now for the ASDWA CWA-SDWA Webinar: Creative Uses of Clean Water Funding for Drinking Water Benefits

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Date:  Tuesday, August 29, 2017

Time:  1:00 to 2:30pm (eastern), 10:00 to 11:30am (pacific)

REGISTER HERE

On August 29, ASDWA will host a Clean Water Act – Safe Drinking Water Act (CWA-SDWA) webinar entitled, “Creative Uses of Clean Water Funding for Drinking Water Benefits.”  The purpose of the webinar is to build on the efforts of ASDWA, ACWA, GWPC, and EPA to share and promote CWA-SDWA coordination activities across state and EPA water programs.  State, interstate, tribal, and federal water programs, water utilities, technical assistance providers, and anyone else who would like to participate is encouraged to attend.  During the webinar, presenters from the Virginia and Washington Drinking Water Programs and the Skagit Public Utilities District (in WA) will share how they collaborated with their state Clean Water Programs and other partners to creatively use some non-traditional funding routes to benefit their drinking water utilities, including one very small and disadvantaged water system.

June 22 AWRA Webinar on Online Source Water Quality Monitoring for Drinking Water Applications

awra june 22 webinar

This Thursday, the American Water Resources Association (AWRA) is hosting a free webinar about EPA’s guidance document entitled, “Online Source Water Quality Monitoring For Water Quality Surveillance and Response Systems.”  During the webinar, Steve Allgeier of EPA will discuss the systematic process for designing an effective online source water monitoring system to help detect water quality incidents (e.g. spills and harmful algal blooms), optimize treatment processes, and characterize long-term trends.

Date:  Thursday, June 22, 2017
Time:  1:00pm (eastern)

Webinar participants will learn best practices on how to:

  • Identify source water threats and assess risks
  • Select water quality parameters and monitoring locations
  • Design water quality monitoring stations
  • Design information management systems to support data analysis
  • Develop procedures to respond to unusual source water quality conditions

Seating is limited – Register here!

 

WRF New Cyanotoxin Webcast Series to Start this Month

WRF HABs

The Water Research Foundation will kick off a new series of three webcasts this month to share the latest information and resources about cyanotoxins in drinking water.  All of these webcasts are being offered free of charge and are open to the public.  Following are the webinar topics, descriptions, and registration information.

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Development of a Risk Communication Tool Kit for Cyanotoxins

Tuesday, June 27, 2017

3:00pm – 4:00pm (eastern)

Register Online

This Webcast is designed to provide listeners with the necessary knowledge to develop and deliver effective cyanotoxin risk communications (WRF project #4697). Listeners will learn about specific attributes of the cyanotoxin risk management framework that can create potential communication barriers, for example the complexity of the EPA health guidance and the uncertainty inherent in monitoring and testing timing and protocol. Listeners will also be introduced to the linguistic research carried out during the project, which was used to develop recommended health advisory/alert language.

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Evaluation and Optimization of Cyanotoxin Analytical Methods

Thursday, July 13th, 2017

3:00pm – 4:00pm (eastern)

Register Online

This webcast will explore the results of Performance Evaluation of Methods for the Analysis of Cyanotoxins (project #4647). The goal of this project is to compare the Ohio EPA and U.S. EPA (Method 546) ADDA-ELISA methods and EPA Method 544, “Determination of Microcystins and Nodularin in Drinking Water by Solid Phase Extraction (SPE) and Liquid Chromatography/Tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC/MS/MS)” and investigate the inconsistencies between the methodologies as well as the precision and accuracies within each method. The findings for this project will be published in 2018; however, valuable preliminary findings will be shared during this webcast.

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Treatment Approaches for Managing Dissolved and Intracellular Cyanotoxins

Tuesday, August 15, 2017

3:00pm – 4:00pm (eastern)

Register Online

This webcast will highlight the effectiveness of conventional and advanced treatment processes for managing intracellular and extracellular cyanotoxins while minimizing unintended consequences. In addition, a summary of the Hazen-Adams CyanoTOX model v.2.0 will be presented. Case studies will be used to illustrate how the model worked at various utilities and will be used to provide a basis for evaluating treatment options.

EPA HABS Webinar on Treatment, Communications, and Management

EPA HABS

On Tuesday, June 27th from 2:00pm to 3:30pm (eastern), EPA’s Office of Research and Development (ORD) will host a webinar entitled, “Harmful Algal Blooms: Treatment, Risk Communications Toolbox, and Management Plans,” as part of the EPA Small Drinking Water Systems Webinar Series.  During the webinar, EPA presenters will:

  • Share information about multiple EPA tools that facilitate proactive planning for harmful algal blooms, including the support document Recommendations for Public Water Systems to Manage Cyanotoxins in Drinking Water and the Cyanotoxin Management Plan Temple and Example Plans.
  • Provide a brief overview of drinking water treatment options for cyanobacteria and their toxins, focusing on the impacts of permanganate addition to suspensions of toxin-producing Microcystis aeruginosa, followed by powdered activated carbon addition.

Register for the webinar here

New State Water Agency Practices for Climate Adaptation on EPA’s Website

New state water agency practices for climate adaptation are now available on EPA’s website.  The compilation of these practices is the result of a collaborative effort by ASDWA, the Association of Clean Water Administrators (ACWA), the Association of State Wetland Managers (ASWM), and EPA’s Office of Water.  ASDWA would like to give a big “thank you” to those states that contributed to this effort both this year and last year.  New state practices this year come from Arizona, Colorado, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Mexico, Oregon, and Washington, and we would like to add more in the future.  Two of the practices that should be of particular interest to state drinking water programs include New Hampshire’s Drinking Water Program Climate Resilience Program, and Oregon’s Harmful Algal Bloom Strategy.  For more information and to view the practices, visit the EPA website HERE.

Three New Water Story Map and Visualization Tools

SWC Nutrient Story Map:  The Source Water Collaborative (SWC) has launched a new interactive highly-visual Nutrient Story Map as part of its Learning Exchange.  This Story Map includes a variety of information about nutrient pollution problems and harmful algal blooms, as well as source water protection challenges and nutrient reduction success projects taking place across the country (see related article).

USGS Water Use Visualization:  The USGS Water Availability and Use Science Program has developed a new “How Much Water Do We Use?” data visualization tool  that highlights USGS data from 1950 to 2010. The visualization highlights how water is used differently in the east versus west half of the country, and shows water use trends for thermoelectric power, public supply, irrigation, and industrial withdrawals. An accompanying press release can be found HERE.

EPA Water Progress Story Map:   EPA has launched a new “Protecting America’s Waters” interactive, multimedia story map to highlight the progress made to protect America’s waters since 2009. This story map features the most prominent accomplishments within the following areas: clean water protection; drinking water safety; water infrastructure; community assistance; climate change resilience; and science and innovation. The story map is a snapshot of EPA’s ongoing efforts toward clean and reliable water.

 

Draft Human Health Recreational Ambient Water Quality Criteria for Cyanotoxins Published by EPA

EPA has just published and is now accepting comments on its draft human health recreational water quality criteria for the cyanotoxins microcystin and cylindrospermopsin.  These are the draft recommended concentrations of microcystins to protect human health while swimming or participating in other recreational activities in and on the water. Once final, states can consider adopting these criteria into their water quality standards and using them for Clean Water Act purposes. Alternatively, states can use these same values as the basis of swimming advisories for public notification purposes at beaches. The draft criteria and/or swimming advisories are based on peer-reviewed, published science and methods. EPA is also providing information on the latest science on human health effects from exposure to cyanotoxins, discussion of other governmental guidelines for recreational waters, and information on incidents involving exposure of pets and other animals to cyanotoxins.  EPA is accepting comments on the draft criteria document for 60 days.

For more information and to view the draft criteria, visit EPA’s website.  For questions, please contact Jamie Strong at strong.jamie@epa.gov.

SWC Launches Nutrient Resources on Learning Exchange

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The Source Water Collaborative (SWC) has launched a series of nutrient related resources as part of its Learning Exchange theme on “Nutrient Reduction Successes.”  We hope that these resources will be helpful for state drinking water programs and others to support and promote source water protection with their partners and stakeholders.  The resources include:

  • blogpost from Jim Taft (ASDWA), Lynn Thorp (Clean Water Action) and Karen Wirth (EPA);
  • A new interactive highly-visual Story Map highlighting projects across the country working to reduce nutrients;
  • A link to the SWC’s Agricultural Collaboration toolkit, which includes tips for partnering with Conservation Districts and State Conservationists; and
  • A link to the webinar recorded earlier this month on messaging SWP in agricultural communities.

To view the resources, visit the Learning Exchange page on the SWC website.

 

 

EPA Releases Three New Cyanotoxin Tools

EPA has just released three new tools that provide public water systems with examples and ready-to-use templates to tailor to their systems, as they see appropriate, and to aid in managing and communicating the risks of cyanotoxins in drinking water. Development of these tools was highlighted in the Algal Toxin Risk Assessment and Management Strategic Plan for Drinking Water, submitted by EPA to Congress in 2015.  The tools are available at:  https://www.epa.gov/ground-water-and-drinking-water/cyanotoxins-drinking-water.

  • The cyanotoxin management plan template and example plans provide a framework for states, tribes and public water systems to develop their own system-specific cyanotoxin management plans. The template includes potential steps for preparing for a bloom and mitigating the effects of a bloom including monitoring, treatment and communication activities. EPA partnered with five utilities to develop system-specific cyanotoxin management plans that provide examples of how water systems are managing cyanotoxin risks.  For questions, please contact Hannah Holsinger at hannah@epa.govor (202) 564-0403.
  • The cyanotoxin drinking water treatment optimization document supports public water systems in developing monitoring and treatment optimization approaches for cyanotoxins to achieve the best performance possible from each treatment process. It presents proactive approaches for water sampling and monitoring to help public water systems anticipate treatment needs and to treat cyanotoxins in drinking water. Information is presented for treating cyanotoxins using many types of water treatment.  For questions, please contact Tom Waters at tom@epa.govor (513) 569-7611.
  • The drinking water cyanotoxin risk communication toolbox is a ready-to-use, “one-stop-shop” to support public water systems, states and local governments in developing, as they deem appropriate, their own risk communication materials. It includes editable worksheets, press release templates, social media posts and other quick references. The materials focus on communicating risk and providing background information to the public prior to and during a drinking water cyanotoxin contamination event as well as general information on harmful algal blooms and cyanotoxins.  For questions, please contact Katie Foreman at katherine@epa.govor (202) 564-3403.

EPA welcomes your questions, along with suggestions for improving any of these documents, as well as ideas for future tool development.

EPA Webinar on Ohio’s Efforts to Reduce Nutrient Pollution in Lakes

EPA’s Watershed Academy will conduct a webinar entitled, “Understanding Nutrient Issues Affecting Ohio’s Inland Lakes,” on Wednesday, November 30 at 1:00 pm to 3:00 pm (eastern).  The webinar will present information on the evolution of Ohio’s efforts to protect and restore inland lakes from nutrient related impairments through the strategic collection and use of data along with engagement of appropriate watershed stakeholders. For more information and to register for the webinar, visit EPA’s Watershed Academy website.