WE&RF and WRF Webinar on Coordinating Water Management and Urban Planning Efforts

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On Thursday, December 7, 2017, from 1:00 pm–2:30 pm (eastern), the Water Environment & Reuse Foundation (WE&RF) and Water Research Foundation (WRF) will conduct a free webinar entitled, “Coordinating Water Management and Urban Planning Efforts.” During the webinar, speakers from the University of Arizona, Brendle Group, and Western Resource Advocates will present the findings from two parallel research projects (project #SIWM5R13 and project #4623) that can be used by both the water and planning sectors to improve coordination, promote resilience in urban environments, and help move cities towards a One Water approach. REGISTER HERE.

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EPA Tools and Resources Webinar: Monitoring Cyanobacteria with Satellites

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On Wednesday, November 15th from 3:00pm to 4:00pm (eastern), EPA will host a webinar to share information about how the use of satellite technology is now advancing to be used for water quality monitoring in lakes and reservoirs. During the webinar, EPA scientist Blake Schaeffer will highlight how federal agencies (EPA, NASA, NOAA and USGS) are collaborating to use real-world satellite applications that support environmental management of US lakes by quantifying cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms (CyanoHABs) and related water quality parameters. This webinar will also discuss how provisional satellite derived cyanobacteria data and three different software tools are available to state environmental and health agencies for review and testing as part of the Cyanobacteria Assessment Network (CyAN). State environmental and health agencies, tribes, communities, researchers and others interested in learning about ways to monitor cyanobacterial blooms are encouraged to attend. REGISTER HERE

Hypoxia Task Force 2017 Report to Congress Highlights Nutrient Reduction Progress

hypoxiaThe Hypoxia Task Force has released its 2017 Report to Congress on the actions the federal, state, and tribal members have taken toward the goal of reducing nitrogen and phosphorus pollution in the Mississippi/Atchafalaya River Basin (MARB) and shrinking the size of the Gulf of Mexico hypoxic zone. This is the second biennial Report to Congress, after the first one in 2015. It was developed and released in accordance with the Harmful Algal Bloom and Hypoxia Research and Control Amendments (HABHRCA) Act of 2014. The Reports to Congress describe the progress made through activities directed by the Hypoxia Task Force toward attainment of the goals of the Gulf Hypoxia Action Plan 2008 to:

  • Target vulnerable lands and quantify nutrient load reductions achieved through federal programs, subject to future appropriations.
  • Implement state nutrient reduction strategies, including targeting vulnerable lands and quantifying nutrient reductions.
  • Expand and build new partnerships and alliances with universities, the agricultural community, cities, and others.
  • Track progress towards the interim target and long-term goal, with intent to understand whether the current actions are appropriate to meet the goal.

The report does include basic information about nutrient impacts on drinking water sources and treatment, as well as specific challenges and actions the MARB affiliated states are taking to address them. To view the report and learn more about the Hypoxia Task Force, visit EPA’s website.

Source Water Collaborative Holds Meeting and Publishes 2016 Accomplishments Report

The National Source Water Collaborative (SWC), for which ASDWA serves as a co-chair with GWPC, held a meeting this week and published its 2016 Accomplishments Report.

SWC Meeting and Field Trip

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The SWC held a meeting and went on a field trip this week in Washington, DC. Participants at the meeting included 35 representatives of the Collaborative’s 27 members and guests. The meeting served to reflect on the accomplishments of the SWC to date and jumpstart a variety of ideas and activities for the members to undertake in 2018. Some of the ideas coming from the discussions included activities related to  innovative funding sources, the upcoming Farm Bill, support for local collaboratives, and outreach to non-traditional partners. The field trip to Arcadia Farm after the meeting also provided a great learning opportunity for some of the participants to learn about the farm’s sustainable farming practices; educational opportunities for school children; training programs for veterans; and mobile market for providing fresh organic produce to disadvantaged communities.

SWC 2016 Accomplishments Report

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The SWC’s 2016 Accomplishments Report explores just a sampling of the various individual and collaborative efforts from the past year and celebrates 10 years of achievement. The SWC started in 2006 with fourteen national organizations, concerned about the implications of shifting landscapes and quickly expanding developments on the safety and sustainability of drinking water supplies. Those 14 members knew that they were faced with a challenge and an opportunity, and by acting together now, they could protect sources of drinking water for generations to come. Over the past ten years, the SWC has experienced tremendous growth and progress—the original 14 members has nearly doubled and is now 27 strong, after welcoming the newest member, American Rivers. The one-stop-shop website boasts a compendium of valuable resources and targeted toolkits, products of member collaborations, while the Twitter feed (@sourcewatercol) has quickly become the place for source water protection news, updates, and member accomplishments. In 2016 the SWC launched the popular Learning Exchange webinars and resources, and participation at high-profile national conferences have greatly expanded its reach and impact.

While the last ten years have been marked by change, the core principle that the SWC was founded on remains— that by working together and combining our strengths, resources, and will to action, this diverse set of member organizations would be able to realize far greater successes than by working alone. This principle still provides the foundation of the Collaborative’s approach and success today. To read the Accomplishments Report, visit the SWC website. We also encourage you to sign up for the email distribution list or follow the SWC on twitter for the latest in source water protection news & events.

Urban Waters Federal Partnership Wins Sammie Award

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Last Week, Surabhi Shah of EPA, and the Urban Waters Federal Partnership team won a 2017 Samuel J. Heyman Service to America Medal. The medals, known as the “Sammies,” are awarded annually by the Partnership for Public Service. They are designed to highlight excellence in the federal workforce and inspire other talented and dedicated individuals to go into public service. This year, the Urban Waters Federal Partnership got the most votes from the public in the People’s Choice category for their work with local, state and federal agencies, businesses, nonprofits and philanthropies to with local, state and federal agencies, businesses, nonprofits and philanthropies to clean up urban waterways and surrounding lands that help spur redevelopment of abandoned properties, promote new businesses, and provide parks and access for boating, swimming, fishing and community gatherings.

The partnership is led by EPA, along with the Departments of Agriculture, Interior, Housing and Urban Development, and 10 other federal agencies. The program has been successful in leveraging resources for more than 250 locations throughout the US to improve more than 22,000 acres of land and engage approximately 100,000 community members.

For more information about the program, visit the Urban Waters Federal Partnership website. For more information about the award, go HERE.

Participate in Imagine a Day Without Water on October 12th

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“Imagine a Day Without Water” will take place on October 12th this year. This event is organized by the Value of Water Campaign and urges organizations across the country to engage in and educate their communities about the state of our nation’s infrastructure and the need for reinvestment. One of the most important ways you can participate in Imagine a Day Without Water is by posting on social media. Whether you have an event to promote or just want to show how much you #ValueWater, please share information about this day with your networks. For more information, to use the graphics, and see how you can host a local event and sign up as a partner, visit the website here.

HABHRCA Report Submitted to Congress

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On August 24th, the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) submitted the “Harmful Algal Blooms and Hypoxia Research Plan and Action Strategy: An Interagency Report” to Congress.  The report focuses on the relationships between federal partners and their stakeholders, and the challenges, concerns, and needs related to HABs and hypoxia, and their impact on Great Lakes regional interests and communities.  The report broadly recommends the following:

  • Improving comprehensive conservation planning;
  • Expanding ecological forecasting and modeling for HABs and hypoxia across the Great Lakes;
  • Refining and developing methods for detecting HAB-related toxins found in the Great Lakes;
  • Developing unified messages on the causes, risks, and mitigation efforts on HABs and hypoxia; and
  • Expanding and integrating information on current and potential future social and environmental impacts of HABs and hypoxia in the Great Lakes.

This report is the second step for fulfilling the requirements of the Harmful Algal Bloom and Hypoxia Research and Control Act (HABHRCA) legislation after the publication of the February 2016 assessment report.  This new report is attached to this article and will be posted on NOAA’s HABHRCA page in the near future.

AMWA Webinar on Water Utility Resilience Innovations

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The Association of Metropolitan Water Agencies is hosting a free one-hour webinar on water utility resilience as part of its Innovation Series. The series highlights innovations by AMWA members through case studies in resilience and sustainability.

Date:  Wednesday, September 13, 2017

Time:  3:00pm – 4:00 pm (eastern)

Register here

The featured topics of this webinar include:  The Climate Action Plan at Fort Collins Utilities, which addresses energy efficiency and climate resiliency; and Austin Water’s Water Forward planning effort, looking at securing a resilient water supply for the next century.

WRF Webcast on Preparedness and Response for Water System Resilience

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Date:  Thursday, August 17, 2017

Time:  3:00pm – 4:00pm (eastern)

Register HERE

The Water Research Foundation (WRF) will host a free webinar entitled, “Preparedness and Response Practices to Support Water System Resilience: Fundamentals, Good Practices, and Innovations.”  This webcast will discuss the findings of Innovative Preparedness and Response Practices to Support Water System Resilience (#4601). Participants will learn about practices in other sectors that could be used in the water sector, a variety of fundamentals and good practices in use at utilities, as well as some innovative practices to consider.

EPA Webinar on Land Use and Water Resources

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EPA will hold a webinar as part of the Safe and Sustainable Resources Research Program monthly series entitled, “Land Use, Environmental Stressors, and Water Resources: Degradation to Restoration.”

Date:  Wednesday, August 30, 2017

Time:  2:00pm to 3:00pm (eastern)

Register at:  https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/4319992565037855234

During the webinar, presenters will discuss environmental stressors and management practices impacting global water quantity and quality; describe a conceptual framework for understanding and predicting global patterns of water use and water quality degradations; and discuss the role of ecosystem restoration and management in securing and improving water resources and related ecosystem services.