SWC Webinar on Engaging Drinking Water Utilities in USDA RCPP Funding Projects

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On Thursday, January 11th, 2018, from 1:30 to 3:00 pm (eastern) the Source Water Collaborative (SWC) will host a webinar as part of its Learning Exchange Webinar Series entitled, “Conservation Grant Funding & Drinking Water Utilities: Partnering for Success.” During the webinar, participants will learn about the efforts of drinking water utilities and conservation groups to partner with farming operations and landowners to protect their water supplies through the U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) Regional Conservation Partnership Program (RCPP). The webinar will be moderated by Adam Carpenter of AWWA and speakers will include:

  • Jimmy Bramblett, Deputy Chief of Programs, USDA NRCS
  • Tariq Baloch, Water Utility Plant Manager, Cedar Rapids. Iowa
  • Sandi Formica, Executive Director, Watershed Conservation Resource Center

Save your spot today by registering here.

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Proposals Now Being Accepted for 2018 Five Star and Urban Waters Restoration Grants

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The Five Star and Urban Waters Restoration program is now accepting grant proposals  for 2018, and expects to award approximately $2 million in grants nationwide. The program is being directed by the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) and the Wildlife Habitat Council, in cooperation with the EPA, the US Forest Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, FedEx and Southern Company. The grant program seeks to develop community capacity to sustain local natural resources for future generations by providing modest financial assistance to diverse local partnerships focused on improving water quality (including protecting drinking water sources), watersheds and the species and habitats they support. Projects include a variety of ecological improvements along with targeted community outreach, education and stewardship, and will represent a mixture of urban and rural communities. Proposals are due by Wednesday, January 31, 2018 and awards will be announced in July 2018. For more information, view the Request for Proposals and visit the NFWF website.

Source Water Collaborative Holds Meeting and Publishes 2016 Accomplishments Report

The National Source Water Collaborative (SWC), for which ASDWA serves as a co-chair with GWPC, held a meeting this week and published its 2016 Accomplishments Report.

SWC Meeting and Field Trip

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The SWC held a meeting and went on a field trip this week in Washington, DC. Participants at the meeting included 35 representatives of the Collaborative’s 27 members and guests. The meeting served to reflect on the accomplishments of the SWC to date and jumpstart a variety of ideas and activities for the members to undertake in 2018. Some of the ideas coming from the discussions included activities related to  innovative funding sources, the upcoming Farm Bill, support for local collaboratives, and outreach to non-traditional partners. The field trip to Arcadia Farm after the meeting also provided a great learning opportunity for some of the participants to learn about the farm’s sustainable farming practices; educational opportunities for school children; training programs for veterans; and mobile market for providing fresh organic produce to disadvantaged communities.

SWC 2016 Accomplishments Report

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The SWC’s 2016 Accomplishments Report explores just a sampling of the various individual and collaborative efforts from the past year and celebrates 10 years of achievement. The SWC started in 2006 with fourteen national organizations, concerned about the implications of shifting landscapes and quickly expanding developments on the safety and sustainability of drinking water supplies. Those 14 members knew that they were faced with a challenge and an opportunity, and by acting together now, they could protect sources of drinking water for generations to come. Over the past ten years, the SWC has experienced tremendous growth and progress—the original 14 members has nearly doubled and is now 27 strong, after welcoming the newest member, American Rivers. The one-stop-shop website boasts a compendium of valuable resources and targeted toolkits, products of member collaborations, while the Twitter feed (@sourcewatercol) has quickly become the place for source water protection news, updates, and member accomplishments. In 2016 the SWC launched the popular Learning Exchange webinars and resources, and participation at high-profile national conferences have greatly expanded its reach and impact.

While the last ten years have been marked by change, the core principle that the SWC was founded on remains— that by working together and combining our strengths, resources, and will to action, this diverse set of member organizations would be able to realize far greater successes than by working alone. This principle still provides the foundation of the Collaborative’s approach and success today. To read the Accomplishments Report, visit the SWC website. We also encourage you to sign up for the email distribution list or follow the SWC on twitter for the latest in source water protection news & events.

ASDWA to Co-Sponsor Technical Session at the March 2018 AWWA Sustainable Water Management Conference

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AWWA is holding its annual Sustainable Water Management Conference next year on March 25-28, 2018 in Seattle and ASDWA is co-sponsoring a technical session. This is the second time ASDWA has co-sponsored a technical session at the conference and this time, the session is entitled “Harness the Power of the Clean Water Act to Protect Sources of Drinking Water.” The session will feature national, state, and local leaders who will speak about their efforts to leverage regulatory programs and funding mechanisms of the Clean Water Act to protect sources of drinking water, and using the Safe Drinking Water Act to advance watershed goals.

The conference will also feature other technical tracks on water efficiency, resilience and sustainability, source water supply, water resource management and planning, alternative water sources, and water reuse. For more information and to register for the conference, visit the AWWA website.

Organizations are Gearing Up for the 2018 Farm Bill

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It’s that time again to get ready for the reauthorization of the next Farm Bill in 2018. ASDWA is engaging in discussions with a variety of partner organizations as well as the Association of Clean Water Administrators (ACWA), to help emphasize the connections to drinking water quality and protection in the Farm Bill’s conservation title. Here is what some of them are doing with regard to their Farm Bill priorities.

AWWA:  The American Water Works Association (AWWA) issued a press release emphasizing the opportunity to encourage partnerships in the Farm Bill. This includes working with water utilities and all stakeholders interested in productive farming practices and safe water to form innovative collaborations that can achieve mutual goals. The AWWA press release notes that they would like to see Congress make an explicit connection between conservation measures and drinking water quality in the Farm Bill’s conservation title. AWWA wants to see that change by:

  • Providing strong funding for conservation programs.
  • Adding a specific goal of protecting sources of drinking water as a priority for all Natural Resources Conservation Service(NRCS) conservation programs.
  • Encouraging NRCS state conservationists, state technical committees, and working groups to work with water utilities in identifying priority areas in each state.
  • Increasing the NRCS cost-share for measures that provide considerable downstream water quality benefits.
  • Dedicating ten percent of conservation funding to protecting sources of drinking water through existing programs.

Visit AWWA’s web site to view the full press release.

NASDA:  The National Association of State Departments of Agriculture (NASDA) established priorities for the next Farm Bill that call for enhanced investment in American agriculture that provides producers the tools they need to succeed. NASDA also emphasized that the Farm Bill is vital to providing consumers access to the safest, highest quality and most affordable food supply, which is essential for our nation’s economy and security. Some of NASDA’s priorities for the 2018 Farm Bill include trade promotion; voluntary conservation programs; specialty crop block grants; research, education and economics; and food safety. While the NASDA press release does not specifically mention water, the NASDA staff have expressed their support for conservation measures that protect water quality, and are planning to have further discussions with ASDWA and ACWA as efforts move forward on the Farm Bill.

FIFBC:  The Forests in the Farm Bill Coalition (FIFBC) released its 2018 Farm Bill recommendations that focus on the need to continue to support rural communities, rural jobs, private forest owners, and the economic and environmental benefits forests provide. The National Association of Conservation Districts, the Nature Conservancy, and the Trust for Public Land are among the 42 members of the Coalition that represents forest owners, conservationists, hunters, anglers, forest industry, and natural resource professionals. Three of the five priorities outlined by the Coalition that are particularly relevant to water and drinking water include:

  • Increasing the long-term protection and conservation of forest resources from threats such as wildfire, insects and diseases, and promote the use of fire as an important forest management tool.
  • Encouraging the retention and perpetuation of forestland and associated values, goods, and services.
  • Streamlining and otherwise improving forest and conservation programs to better enable use by private landowners and land managers to address the above issues.

The FIFBC press release about the Farm Bill acknowledges clean water among the benefits that the nation’s forests provide, though it is not specifically mentioned in the priorities for the Farm Bill.

 

 

 

Urban Waters Federal Partnership Wins Sammie Award

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Last Week, Surabhi Shah of EPA, and the Urban Waters Federal Partnership team won a 2017 Samuel J. Heyman Service to America Medal. The medals, known as the “Sammies,” are awarded annually by the Partnership for Public Service. They are designed to highlight excellence in the federal workforce and inspire other talented and dedicated individuals to go into public service. This year, the Urban Waters Federal Partnership got the most votes from the public in the People’s Choice category for their work with local, state and federal agencies, businesses, nonprofits and philanthropies to with local, state and federal agencies, businesses, nonprofits and philanthropies to clean up urban waterways and surrounding lands that help spur redevelopment of abandoned properties, promote new businesses, and provide parks and access for boating, swimming, fishing and community gatherings.

The partnership is led by EPA, along with the Departments of Agriculture, Interior, Housing and Urban Development, and 10 other federal agencies. The program has been successful in leveraging resources for more than 250 locations throughout the US to improve more than 22,000 acres of land and engage approximately 100,000 community members.

For more information about the program, visit the Urban Waters Federal Partnership website. For more information about the award, go HERE.

GWPC Annual Forum and Source Water Protection Workshop Held Last Week

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The Ground Water Protection Council (GWPC) held its Annual Forum last week in Boston, Massachusetts, that included a source water protection workshop and multiple sessions on ground water connections to drinking water, private wells, stormwater, brownfields, Underground Injection Control and state oil and gas programs, and more. Forum attendees included representatives from state and EPA ground water and source water programs, state oil and gas programs, the Department of Energy, energy companies, associations (including ASDWA), and consulting firms.

The Source Water Protection Workshop was held the day before the Forum to highlight effective collaborations and discuss opportunities at the national, state, and local levels to protect drinking water. Opening remarks were provided by Peter Grevatt, Director of EPA’s Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water, and Jane Downing of EPA Region 1 who spoke about the importance of source water protection as well as continuing challenges with emerging contaminants (e.g., PFAS and 1-4 Dioxane), extreme weather, chemical spills, and emergency response. Presentations during the workshop included information about the Source Water Collaborative tools; Clean Water Act and Safe Drinking Water Act coordination; working with USDA NRCS State Conservationists; the Iowa Source Water Agricultural Collaborative; working with state geologists; and a new source water protection scorecard tool being used for the Hudson River in New York. Key takeaways from the workshop included the need to:

  • Use visible “science” and accurate data as a catalyst to motivate action and engage partners, as shown by the attention drawn to drilling trucks arriving on farms for groundwater investigations in Iowa.
  • Use state geologists as a resource, as highlighted by the valued added in sharing and understanding ground water connections by use of geologic maps during the recent Vermont State Workshops.
  • Get more information and tips on navigating opportunities to work with NRCS and agricultural partners on the ground, as discussed in relation to current nation-wide funding initiatives and projects that are underway in Connecticut.

After the workshop, the GWPC Annual Forum kicked off with opening session that included remarks by GWPC’s President Marty Link of Nebraska and by the Ground Water Research and Education Foundation President Stan Belieu, also of Nebraska. Bethany Card, the Deputy Commissioner of Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection also shared information about her state’s efforts to address lead in schools, climate change, drought and water withdrawals, and clean water act coordination. In addition, Nancy Johnson of the Department of Energy highlighted their activities to address energy, water, and seismicity; and Peter Grevatt of EPA provided perspective on the Agency’s efforts to work with states on source water protection and UIC activities. Other highlights from the Forum’s concurrent sessions included:

  • Information about GWPC’s efforts to develop a produced water report on using flowback water from oil and gas wells for beneficial uses.
  • Presentations about efforts to assess and address PFAS in New Hampshire, and by the National Ground Water Association to develop a report on the State of Knowledge and Practice that will be published this fall.
  • Presentations from the University of New Hampshire and EPA Region 1 on potential impacts to ground water from stormwater infiltration, and from SCS Engineers on connecting human health with brownfields remediation and revitalization.

Other interesting presentations included information about Connecticut’s first state water plan, land use and source water protection planning in Vermont, and New Hampshire’s efforts to inspect above ground storage tanks and conduct emergency response exercises. For more information, visit the GWPC website.

New Pay-For-Performance Conservation Guide Provides Alternative Nonpoint Source Reduction Solution

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Winrock International and Delta Institute have published a “Pay-For-Performance Conservation:  A How-To Guide.” The guide is intended to serve as a handbook for agricultural and conservation organizations, as well as publicly-owned treatment works (POTWs) and municipalities who are interested in planning and implementing a flexible solution to agricultural nonpoint source pollution. The alternative “pay-for-performance” (PfP) conservation approach presented in the guide uses field and farm specific information, combined with nutrient and economic modeling to calculate payments to farmers based on quantified estimates of nutrient reductions. The guide describes the steps for implementing a new PfP program and also provides examples of challenges and successes from existing programs in Iowa, Vermont, Wisconsin, Michigan, Ohio, and Ontario.  Download the guide HERE.

Register Now for ASDWA Webinar on Leveraging CWA 319 and SDWA Programs for Surface and Ground Water Quality Planning

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ASDWA CWA-SDWA Webinar:  Leveraging CWA 319 and SDWA Programs for Surface and Ground Water Quality Planning

Date:  Tuesday, November 7, 2017

Time:  1:00pm – 2:30pm (eastern), 10:00am – 11:30am (pacific)

REGISTER HERE

On November 7, ASDWA will host a free Clean Water Act – Safe Drinking Water Act (CWA-SDWA) webinar entitled, “Leveraging CWA 319 and SDWA Programs for Surface and Ground Water Quality Planning.” The purpose of the webinar is to build on the efforts of ASDWA, ACWA, GWPC, and EPA to share and promote CWA-SDWA coordination activities across state and EPA water programs. State, interstate, tribal, and federal water programs, water utilities, technical assistance providers, and anyone else who would like to participate is encouraged to attend. During the webinar, presenters from the Nebraska and Nevada state water programs will share how they coordinated with EPA and local communities to leverage the CWA 319 nonpoint source (NPS) program for surface and ground water quality protection planning in drinking water supply areas.

We hope you will attend!

AWWA Webinar on Funding Mechanisms for Source Water Protection Programs

AWWA-logoOn Wednesday, September 20th, from 1:00pm – 2:30pm (eastern), AWWA will host a webinar on “Funding Mechanisms for Source Water Protection Programs.”  Webinar participants will learn how to make a case for creating a permanent source water protection reserve account and how to set up a reserve account to enable long-term land acquisition, conservation easements, land use best management practices, monitoring, education, and other critical source water protection projects.  The cost of the webinar is $75.00 for AWWA members and $120.00 for nonmembers.  For more information and to register, visit AWWA’s website.